Figgins Family Crest
Great Grandma
Elizabeth Richardson
Great Grandpa
George O'Fandhagain
Great Grandma
Mary M. Snyder
Great Grandpa
Joseph Adamson
Great Grandma
Unknown
Great Grandpa
Unknown
Great Grandma
Unknown
Great Grandpa
Unknown
Grandma
Polly Adamson
Grandpa
Daniel Feagin
Grandma
Unknown
Grandpa
Unknown
Mother
Margaret Smith
Father
Edward Feagin
M

Captain Daniel Feagin

Daniel Feagan enlisted in 1776 at Loudoun County, Virginia. In 1788 he moved to Simon Kenton's Station, Mason County, Kentucky and then to Fayette County, Ohio. He died during a visit to the home of his son-in-law, Jacob Burgat (Busgat) near Georgetown, Brown County, Ohio where he was buried.

Mason County, Kentucky Deeds:
27 Oct 1806 Daniel FEEGANS (FEAGANS) and Violet his wife of Clermont County, Ohio and Anderson Doniphan of Mason County.
Adjoining lots of German Town, and bounded by Vawter, Tabbs, John Kenton; to a survey of land laid off for Samuel Thompson and sold by him to Joel Jackson to a survey made for Myers: then to John Adams Land.

In 1786 Daniel Feagan's family, John Arnold's family and John Kirkpatrick migrated from Virginia down the Ohio River in flat boats, the only way to travel in those times. They made their homes for eight or ten years on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River, not far from Simon Kenton's Station, near Limestone, now Maysville, and Augusta just below Maysville.

Daniel Feagan knew Kenton before they left Virginia and he warned them on their way down the river to watch for Indian decoys, such as kettles on poles for camping along the river. In those days the Indians were on the warpath and brought sorrow to many pioneer homes.

Captain Feagan was given a Grant of 3000 acres of land for his service in the Revolutionary War, 2,000 on the Kentucky side of the Ohio and 1,000 on the Ohio side in Brown County, then Clermont County. He made his clearing near where Georgetown now stands and died there in 1815.

Fielding Feagan and four sons came up from Brown County into Fayette County in 1809, also John Arnold and John Kirkpatrick. These families were the very early pioneers in Fayette County, and their descendants did not stop going West until they reached the Pacific Coast.

The Indian tragedy in Kentucky was near August about the year 1800. Fielding Feagan and his brother-in-law Absolem Craig, Josiah Wood a brother-in-law to Absolem Craig and Cornelius Washburn went on a hunting trip about 15 miles from the settlement. They made their camp near a spring, and one day while they were out hunting, the Indians came to their camp and lay in ambush until they returned. Craig and Feagan started the fire, then Fielding went to the spring for water when he heard gunfire, and knew what was up and started for the settlement, with two Indians after him. He outran them and reached the settlement where they made up a company and started for the camp. When they arrived, they found Craig had been scalped and his body thrown across the fire and badly burned. The Indians had taken their horses, guns and all their equipment. Absolem Craig had a fine shout pouch, and the powder horn was finished in silver.

A few years after the tragedy, two Indians came to Fielding Feagan's home over on the Ohio side of the River, and one of them had the shot pouch of Absolem Craig. Feagan followed them and killed one and the other fled. He buried the Indian on the West bank of White Oak Creek about one mile below Georgetown, then threw the rifle of the Indian into the deep water. He kept all secret until 1832 when the river washed the skeleton up.

The same story is told in the Brown County and Clermont County histories. Captain Feagan and his sons were drilled by Simon Kenton in all the traits of war. At another encounter of Fielding Feagan with an Indian they fought with dirk knives and Fielding had a scar from his ear to his chin, which he carried to his grave.

Fielding Feagan migrated to Richmond, Iowa and is buried in the Richmond Cemetery, Washington County, Iowa.